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“Neural Orchestration of Metabolism and Islet function”
I. General points on the central control of energy balance and food intake
II. Mechanisms of direct detection of nutrients and hormones by the brain
III. Gastrointestinal and vagal detection of nutrients
IV. Control of β-cell function by the brain
V. Conclusion
References
Lectures during IGIS meeting